Outcome 2 Understand how to communicate with children, young people and adults

2.1 explain the skills needed to communicate with children and young people

2.2 explain how to adapt communication with children and young people for:

a) the age of the child or young person

b) the context of the communication

c) communication differences

2.3 explain the main differences between communicating with adults and communicating withchildren and young people

2.4 explain how to adapt communication to meet different communication needs of adults

2.5 explain how to manage disagreements with children, young people and adults.

 

Unit 301-Assessment criteria- 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5

Unit 305 Assessment criteria -3.1.3.2.3.3 -Skills for communication with adults and children

Communication skill

Benefits- what does it achieve?

What affects

Communication?

Skills/

Techniques to help

Communicating with adults

Active listening

 

Boosts confidence and self-esteem.

 

Allows repetition of key facts.

 

Demonstrates interest.

Age

Use developmentally appropriate language.

 

Use correct form of address (name or title).

 

Be on same eye level.

 

 

Active listening and positive comments are still appropriate, although responses do not need to be exaggerated.

 

Open ended questions

 

Encourages sustained conversation.

 

Confirms understanding of key points.

 

Allows modelling of vocabulary or grammar.

 

Develops language skills.

Context of communication

 

Use body language, facial expression & tone to reflect context.

 

Encourage use of appropriate vocabulary through modelling and repetition.

 

 

Communication with adults in school is usually on a professional basis; courtesy and respect should be shown, with use of the preferred form of address.

 

 

Visual props

 

Promotes expansion of vocabulary.

 

Reinforces meaning.

 

Engages interest.

Language

 

Use visual props or sign language.

 

Frequent repetition of key words or phrases.

 

Use simple, unambiguous language.

 

Allow sufficient time for responses.

 

Learn key words (e.g.: greetings) in home language.

 

Adults usually have a longer attention span than children, so communication can be more prolonged.

 

More complex vocabulary and grammar can often be used

Non-verbal communication

 

Helps to convey meaning.

Provides further opportunities for self-expression and communication.

 

Encourages participation

Sensory impairment

 

Make effective use of specialist equipment.

 

Use visual/tactile props or sign language.

 

Speak clearly

 

Ensure area is well lit and minimise distractions.

 

Ensure face is visible when speaking.

 

It may be appropriate to communicate with adults in a range of ways; letter, telephone, email, etc., as well as face-to-face.

Positive responses

 

 

Encourages consideration for others.

 

Demonstrates respect for others’ views.

 

Develops listening skills.

 

Speech, language or communication impairment

                         

 

Use appropriate non-verbal communication.

 

Be patient.

 

Allow sufficient time for responses.

 

Give full attention.

 

Offer regular praise and encouragement.

 

 

Turn taking

 

Demonstrates interest.

 

Creates supportive atmosphere. Eye contact

 

Helps to establish rapport

 

Cognitive abilities

 

Keep information clear and to the point.

 

Avoid complex instructions.

 

Regularly check understanding.

 

Use visual props or demonstrations as appropriate.

 

 

More complex vocabulary and grammar can often be used

 

 

Emotional state

                         

 

Recognise and respect reluctance to communicate.

 

Use positive body language and facial expression.

 

Use open questions to encourage communication.

 

 

 

 

Cultural differences

                         

 

Use correct title/form of address.

Respect etiquette (e.g. eye contact, personal space).

 

Communication with adults in school is usually on a professional basis; courtesy and respect should be shown, with use of the preferred form of address.

 

 

 

 

Children and Young people

301.2.1 Explain the skills needed to communicate with children and young people

You are supporting a new child to the school with numeracy what are the main communication skills you would use and for what justification?

301.2.2 Explain how to adapt communication with children and young people for:

a) the age of the child or young person

b) the context of the communication

c) communication differences

Describe a situation at school with a pupil where you have had to adapt your communication styles? How was the support to the child made more successful by the communication skills you used?

301.2.3 explain the main differences between communicating with adults and communicating with children and young people

Describe what techniques you would use to make communication more effective with children and describe in what ways these communication styles would differ and have to be adapted when communicating with adults?

Adults

301 2.4 explain how to adapt communication to meet different communication needs of adults

Scenario 1

You have got to contact a parent about an incident at school. What is the best form of communication and how would you manage the communication? What skills and communication styles would you exhibit and why would these be effective?

Scenario 2

You are in the staff room with a colleague who is upset about something. What skills would you use and for what reasons?

Scenario 3

You are on a training course and have been put in a group of people who you have not met before in order to complete a team building task. How do establish rapport and a professional relationship with the other team members?

 

301 2.5 305.3.4 use skills and techniques to resolve misunderstandings and conflicts constructively.

 

Scenario 4

You are supporting a science lesson in a Year 9 classroom. There has been some light- hearted banter amongst the learners re the forthcoming school prom. You have intervened in a friendly way but the general chat has continued and as it hasn’t seemed to have affected their work – you have ignored it. When the lesson ends you are going towards the next class when you see that two of the learners are shouting abuse at each other. When you ask them what is wrong, one of them turns on you and shouts for you ‘to mind your own business!’

 

Action to take

 

Scenario 5

You are on playground duty with another teaching assistant (TA) and a volunteer helper you notice that a child has fallen over and the other TA goes to help the child. The volunteer helper suddenly turns on the TA demanding to know what she is doing and what her qualifications are in First Aid. When the TA tries to explain that she doesn’t have any qualifications, the volunteer helper butts in that she has no right to touch the child.

 

Action to take

 

Scenario 6

Sahid and Gemma are 4. They are playing in the outdoor area just outside the YR classroom. Sahid is riding the new shiny red bike. Gemma is shouting that she wants a go and is holding onto the back of the saddle. Sahid is shouting that it is, ‘Not your turn!’

 

Action to take

 

 

301.Learning Outcome 2 worksheet
301.2.1.2.2.2.3.2.4.2.5worksheet.docx
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